Welcome Sponsors and CRO’s

 
 
 
 

Meridian Clinical Research is a dynamic group of medical professionals dedicated to the advancement of clinical research. Meridian was established in 1999 and is comprised of 6 locations in the US and 2 in Mexico: Dakota Dunes, SD, Norfolk, NE, Omaha, NE, Savannah (Internal Medicine), GA, Savannah (Dermatology), GA, Savannah (Neurology), GA, and Guadalajara, Mexico.

Our locations focus on a full range of Phase I through Phase IV trials.

Each of Our Sites Offer

 
 
 
 
  • Trial experience with large vaccine studies
  • Pediatric trial experience
  • Experience in enrolling high volume vaccine trials
  • Rapid data turn around
  • CLIA-approved laboratories
  • IATA certified laboratory staff
  • Large capacity -70 to -20 degree freezers
  • Off-site temperature monitoring
  • Dedicated vaccine refrigerators
  • Back-up generators
  • Refrigerated and standard centrifuges
  • Climate-controlled investigational product storage
  • Double locked, climate-controlled narcotic storage
  • Ability to use a central IRB
  • Ability to use a central laboratory
  • Recruitment Call Center
  • Conference rooms with wireless Internet connection
  • Convenient at the door parking
  • Safe, secure facilities with intruder security systems
  • Closed-circuit camera monitoring
  • Fire detection systems
  • 24 hour emergency staffing

Research Experience

 
 
 
 

Meridian has extensive vaccine and indication based research experience.
Our research programs are open for new drug treatments, as well as for those interested in clinical trials of currently available medications.
Please contact us if you are interested in learning more about partnering with Meridian Clinical Research.

Clinical Trial Experience

 
 
 
 
  • Neurology
  • Obesity
  • Pain Management
  • Psychiatric
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Rheumatology
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Urology
  • Women’s Health
  • Orthopedics
  • Dermatology
  • Allergies
  • Cardiovascular
  • Gastroenterology​
  • Healthy Subject Trials​
  • Infectious Disease​
  • Internal Medicine​
  • Metabolic Disorders​
  • Nephrology
  • Pediatric ​
  • Consumer Health​
  • Endocrinology

We have been conducting vaccine research trials since 1999

 
 
 
 
  • H1N1 Influenza Vaccine
  • H5N1 Influenza Vaccine
  • HPV Vaccine
  • Ebola Virus Vaccine
  • C. Diff Vaccine
  • Herpes Vaccine
  • Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine
  • Meningitis Vaccine, Pediatric
  • PIV3
  • Plague Vaccine
  • RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) Vaccine
  • Seasonal Influenza Vaccine, Adults, Pediatric, Geriatric
  • Smallpox Vaccine
  • Smoking Cessation Vaccine
  • West Nile Virus Vaccine

Dedicated Recruitment Call Center

 
 
 
 

What makes Meridian different?
We have a dedicated call center to help you quickly and effectively reach your enrollment goals.
Our call center representatives are GCP trained professionals who are dedicated to connecting patients with the right trials.

Internal Business Development

 
 
 
 

Wes Bonner is Vice President of Business Development for the American and International sites of Meridian Clinical Research.
Please contact Wes to see how partnering with Meridian can benefit your clinical research team.

Wes Bonner
Vice President, Business Development
wbonner@mcrmed.com

We have conducted hundreds of clinical research trials since our founding in 1999.

Below is a list of various indications

Allergy, Respiratory

An allergy is a hypersensitivity disorder of the immune system. Allergic reactions occur when a person’s immune system reacts to normally harmless substances in the environment. A substance that causes a reaction is called an allergen. These reactions are acquired, predictable, and rapid. Allergy is one of four forms of hypersensitivity and is formally called type I (or immediate) hypersensitivity. Allergic reactions are distinctive because of excessive activation of certain white blood cells called mast cells and basophils by a type of antibody called Immunoglobulin E (IgE). This reaction results in an inflammatory response which can range from uncomfortable to dangerous. (more)

Cardiovascular (coronary artery disease, hypertension and lipid trials)

Coronary artery disease (CAD; also atherosclerotic heart disease) is the result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques [this plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol etc.] within the walls of the coronary arteries that supply the myocardium (the muscle of the heart) with oxygen and nutrients. The deposition of the plaque in the lumen (free space in the artery for the flow of nutrients, oxygen etc.) of an artery causes narrowing of lumen of the artery by decreasing its diameter. It is sometimes also called coronary heart disease (CHD). (more)

Consumer Health / Product Research

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) helps bridge the gap between patients and health resources. The Kaiser model[further explanation needed] is an example of allowing patients to remotely communicate with their physicians or other healthcare professionals.
Consumer Health Informatics include technologies focused on patients as the primary users to health information.
Consumer Health Informatics includes: Information Resources, Communications, Remote Monitoring, Videoconferencing, and Telepresence.
Medical informatics has expanded rapidly over the past couple of years. (more)

Endocrinology

Endocrinology (from Greek ἔνδον, endo, “within”; κρῑνω, krīnō, “to separate”; and -λογία, -logia) is a branch of biology and medicine dealing with the endocrine system, its diseases, and its specific secretions called hormones, the integration of developmental events proliferation, growth, and differentiation (including histogenesis and organogenesis) and the coordination of metabolism, respiration, excretion, movement, reproduction, and sensory perception depend on chemical cues, substances synthesized and secreted by specialized cells.
(more)

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia (FM or FMS) is a medical disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain and allodynia, a heightened and painful response to pressure. Fibromyalgia symptoms are not restricted to pain, leading to the use of the alternative term fibromyalgia syndrome for the condition. Other symptoms include debilitating fatigue, sleep disturbance, and joint stiffness. Some patients also report difficulty with swallowing, bowel and bladder abnormalities, numbness and tingling, and cognitive dysfunction. Fibromyalgia is frequently comorbid with psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety and stress-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder.
(more)

Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology (MeSH heading) is a branch of medicine focused on the digestive system and its disorders. The name is a combination of three Ancient Greek words gaster (gen.: gastros) (stomach), enteron (intestine), and logos (reason). In the United States, Gastroenterology is an Internal Medicine Subspecialty certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine (AOBIM). (more)

Healthy Subject Trials

Clinical trials are sets of tests in medical research and drug development that generate safety and efficacy data (or more specifically, information about adverse drug reactions and adverse effects of other treatments) for health interventions (e.g., drugs, diagnostics, devices, therapy protocols). They’re conducted only after satisfactory information has been gathered on the quality of the nonclinical safety, and health authority/ethics committee approval is granted in the country where approval of the drug or device is sought. (more)

Infectious Disease (including anti-viral research)

Infectious diseases, also known as transmissible diseases or communicable diseases comprise clinically evident illness (i.e., characteristic medical signs and/or symptoms of disease) resulting from the infection, presence and growth of pathogenic biological agents in an individual host organism. In certain cases, infectious diseases may be asymptomatic for much or even all of their course in a given host. In the latter case, the disease may only be defined as a “disease” (which by definition means an illness) in hosts who secondarily become ill after contact with an asymptomatic carrier. An infection is not synonymous with an infectious disease, as some infections do not cause illness in a host.
(more)

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine or general medicine (in Commonwealth nations) is the medical specialty dealing with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of adult diseases. Physicians specializing in internal medicine are called internists, or physicians (without a modifier) in Commonwealth nations. Internists are especially skilled in the management of patients who have undifferentiated or multi-system disease processes. Internists care for hospitalized and ambulatory patients and may play a major role in teaching and research.
(more)

Metabolic Disorders

Inborn errors of metabolism comprise a large class of genetic diseases involving disorders of metabolism. The majority are due to defects of single genes that code for enzymes that facilitate conversion of various substances (substrates) into others (products). In most of the disorders, problems arise due to accumulation of substances which are toxic or interfere with normal function, or to the effects of reduced ability to synthesize essential compounds. Inborn errors of metabolism are now often referred to as congenital metabolic diseases or inherited metabolic diseases. (more)

Migraine and Headaches

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent moderate to severe headaches often in association with a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The word derives from the Greek ἡμικρανία (hemikrania), “pain on one side of the head”,[1] from ἡμι- (hemi-), “half”, and κρανίον (kranion), “skull”.

Typically the headache is unilateral (affecting one half of the head) and pulsating in nature, lasting from 2 to 72 hours. Associated symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, photophobia (increased sensitivity to light), phonophobia (increased sensitivity to sound) and the pain is generally aggravated by physical activity. Up to one-third of people with migraine headaches perceive an aura: a transient visual, sensory, language, or motor disturbance which signals that the headache will soon occur. Occasionally an aura can occur with little or no headache following it.

Migraines are believed to be due to a mixture of environmental and genetic factors. (more)

Nephrology

Nephrology (from Greek νεφρός – nephros, “kidney”, combined with the suffix -logy, “the study of”) is a specialty of medicine and pediatrics that concerns itself with the study of normal kidney function, kidney problems, the treatment of kidney problems and renal replacement therapy (dialysis and kidney transplantation). Systemic conditions that affect the kidneys (such as diabetes and autoimmune disease) and systemic problems that occur as a result of kidney problems (such as renal osteodystrophy and hypertension) are also studied in nephrology. (more)

Neurology and Central Nervous System

Neurology (from Greek νεῦρον, neuron, “nerve” + the suffix -λογία, ‘-logia’, “study of”) is a medical specialty dealing with disorders of the nervous system. To be specific, neurology deals with the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.
(more)

Obesity

Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have an adverse effect on health, leading to reduced life expectancy and/or increased health problems. People are considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of the person’s height in metres, exceeds 30 kg/m2.
(more)

Pain Management

Pain management (also called pain medicine or algiatry) is a branch of medicine employing an interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those living with pain. The typical pain management team includes medical practitioners, clinical psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists. The team may also include other mental-health specialists and massage therapists. Pain sometimes resolves promptly once the underlying trauma or pathology has healed, and is treated by one practitioner, with drugs such as analgesics and (occasionally) anxiolytics. Effective management of chronic (long-term) pain, however, frequently requires the coordinated efforts of the management team.
(more)

Psychiatric

Psychiatry is the medical specialty devoted to the study, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, of mental disorders. These include various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities. The term was first coined by the German physician Johann Christian Reil in 1808, and literally means the ‘medical treatment of the soul’ (psych-: soul; from Ancient Greek psykhē: soul; -iatry: medical treatment; from Gk. iātrikos: medical, iāsthai: to heal). A medical doctor specializing in psychiatry is a psychiatrist. Psychiatric assessment typically starts with a mental status examination and the compilation of a case history. Psychological tests and physical examinations may be conducted, including on occasion the use of neuroimaging or other neurophysiological techniques. (more)

Pulmonary Disease

Respiratory disease is a medical term that encompasses pathological conditions affecting the organs and tissues that make gas exchange possible in higher organisms, and includes conditions of the upper respiratory tract, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, pleura and pleural cavity, and the nerves and muscles of breathing. Respiratory diseases range from mild and self-limiting, such as the common cold, to life-threatening entities like bacterial pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, and lung cancer. The study of respiratory disease is known as pulmonology. (more)

Rheumatology

Rheumatology (Greek rheuma, river) is a sub-specialty in internal medicine and pediatrics, devoted to diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases. Clinicians who specialize in rheumatology are called rheumatologists. Rheumatologists deal mainly with clinical problems involving joints, soft tissues, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and heritable connective tissue disorders. (more)

Smoking Cessation

Smoking cessation (colloquially quitting smoking) is the process of discontinuing the practice of inhaling a smoked substance. This article focuses exclusively on cessation of tobacco smoking; however, the methods described may apply to cessation of smoking other substances that can be difficult to stop using due to the development of strong physical substance dependence or psychological dependence (addiction). (more)

Urology

Urology (from Greek οὖρον – oûron, “urine” and -λογία, -logia “study of”) is the medical and surgical specialty that focuses on the urinary tracts of males and females, and on the reproductive system of males. Medical professionals specializing in the field of urology are called urologists and are trained to diagnose, treat, and manage patients with urological disorders. The organs covered by urology include the kidneys, adrenal glands, ureters, urinary bladder, urethra, and the male reproductive organs. Urology is one of the most competitive specialties to enter for physicians. (more)

Women's Health

Women’s health refers to health issues specific to human female anatomy. These often relate to structures such as female genitalia and breasts or to conditions caused by hormones specific to, or most notable in, females. Women’s health issues include menstruation, contraception, maternal health, child birth, menopause and breast cancer. T hey can also include medical situations in which women face problems not directly related to their biology, for example gender-differentiated access to medical treatment. (more)

Strep Throat

Evaluation of the Clinical Performance of the Alere BinaxNOW Strep A Advanced Card Test. (more)

Actinic Keratosis

Actinic keratosis is a premalignant condition of thick, scaly, or crusty patches of skin. It is more common in fair-skinned people and it is associated with those who are frequently exposed to the sun, as it is usually accompanied by solar damage. They are considered as potentially pre-cancerous, since some of them progress to squamous cell carcinoma, so treatment is recommended. Untreated lesions have up to 20% risk of progression to squamous cell carcinoma. (more)

Anthrax Vaccine

Anthrax is an acute disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Most forms of the disease are lethal, and it affects both humans and animals. There are effective vaccines against anthrax, and some forms of the disease respond well to antibiotic treatment. (more)

Asthma

Asthma (from the Greek ἅσθμα, ásthma, “panting”) is the common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma is clinically classified according to the frequency of symptoms, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate. Asthma may also be classified as atopic (extrinsic) or non-atopic (intrinsic). (more)

Cardiovascular Risk

Cardiovascular disease refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system, principally cardiac disease, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. The causes of cardiovascular disease are diverse but atherosclerosis and/or hypertension are the most common. Additionally, with aging come a number of physiological and morphological changes that alter cardiovascular function and lead to subsequently increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in healthy asymptomatic individual. (more)

Clostridium difficile Bacteria Vaccine

The Cdiffense Trial – Efficacy, Immunogenicity, and Safety Study of Clostridium difficile Toxoid Vaccine in Subjects at Risk for C. difficileInfection. (more)

Constipation

Cardiovascular disease refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system, principally cardiac disease, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. The causes of cardiovascular disease are diverse but atherosclerosis and/or hypertension are the most common. Additionally, with aging come a number of physiological and morphological changes that alter cardiovascular function and lead to subsequently increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in healthy asymptomatic individual. (more)

COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the occurrence of chronic bronchitis or emphysema, a pair of commonly co-existing diseases of the lungs in which the airways narrow over time. This limits airflow to and from the lungs, causing shortness of breath (dyspnea). In clinical practice, COPD is defined by its characteristically low airflow on lung function tests. In contrast to asthma, this limitation is poorly reversible and usually gets progressively worse over time. (more)

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus, or simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. This high blood sugar produces the classical symptoms of polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst) and polyphagia (increased hunger). (more)

Fever Blister / Cold Sore

A Multicenter, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Randomized, Three-treatment, Parallel Design Bioequivalence Study Comparing Mylan’s Acyclovir Cream to GSK’s Zovirax Cream in the Treatment of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Labialis. (more)

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia (FM or FMS) is a medical disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain and allodynia (a heightened and painful response to pressure). Fibromyalgia symptoms are not restricted to pain, leading to the use of the alternative term fibromyalgia syndrome for the condition. Other symptoms include debilitating fatigue, sleep disturbance, and joint stiffness. Some patients also report difficulty with swallowing, bowel and bladder abnormalities, numbness and tingling, and cognitive dysfunction. (more)

Healthy Adult Studies

A clinical trial for adults age 19 and over who will participate in vaccine trials.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, or spastic colon) is a symptom-based diagnosis characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits. As a functional bowel disorder, IBS has no known organic cause. Diarrhea or constipation may predominate, or they may alternate (classified as IBS-D, IBS-C or IBS-A, respectively). (more)

Male Nocturia

Nocturia (derived from Latin nox, night, and Greek [τα] ούρα, urine), also called nycturia (Greek νυκτουρία), is the need to get up in the night to urinate, thus interrupting sleep. (more)

Meningitis B Vaccine

Meningitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges. The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs. Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation’s proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore, the condition is classified as a medical emergency. (more)

Overactive Bladder

The Beside Study – A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multi-Centre Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Adding Mirabegron to Solifenacin in Incontinent OAB Subjects who have Received Solifenacin for 4 Weeks and Warrant Additional Relief for their OAB Symptoms. (more)

Osteoarthritis Knee

Knee osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease of the knee joint. It is more common in people older than 40 years. Women are more likely to be affected. (more)

Pediatric Cold

A clinical trial for children ages 6 to 11 years of age with cough and cold like symptoms.

Pediatric H5N1

The influenza vaccination, also known as a flu shot, is an annual vaccination using a vaccine specific for a given year to protect against the highly variable influenza virus. (more)

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by an irresistible urge to move one’s body to stop uncomfortable or odd sensations. It most commonly affects the legs, but can affect the arms, torso, and even phantom limbs. Moving the affected body part modulates the sensations, providing temporary relief. (more)

Rabies Vaccine

Rabies vaccine is a vaccine used to control rabies. Rabies can be prevented by vaccination, both in humans and other animals. (more)

Safety of Flublok vs. Licensed IIV

This trial is open to anyone over the age of 50, who either has not had their flu shot this season, or had their flu shot more than 30 days ago.

Smallpox Vaccine

The smallpox vaccine was the first successful vaccine to be developed. The process of vaccination was first publicised by Edward Jenner in 1796, who acted upon his observation that milkmaids who caught the cowpox virus did not catch smallpox. Before widespread vaccination, mortality rates in individuals with smallpox were high—up to 35% in some cases. (more)

H1N1 Influenza Vaccine

The 2009 flu pandemic vaccines are the set of influenza vaccines that have been developed to protect against the pandemic H1N1/09 virus. These vaccines either contain inactivated (killed) influenza virus, or weakened live virus that cannot cause influenza. The killed vaccine is injected, while the live vaccine is given as a nasal spray. Both these types of vaccine are usually produced by growing the virus in chicken eggs. (more)

H5N1 Influenza Vaccine

A H5N1 vaccine is an influenza vaccine intended to provide immunization to influenza A virus subtype H5N1.

Vaccines have been formulated against several of the avian H5N1 influenza varieties. Vaccination of poultry against the ongoing H5N1 epizootic is widespread in certain countries. Some vaccines also exist for use in humans, and others are in testing, but none have been made available to civilian populations, nor produced in quantities sufficient to protect more than a tiny fraction of the Earth’s population in the event of an H5N1 pandemic. (more)

HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine

The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine prevents infection with certain species of human papillomavirus associated with the development of cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers. Two HPV vaccines are currently on the market: Gardasil and Cervarix. (more)

Herpes Vaccine

Herpes simplex (Greek: ἕρπης herpēs, “creeping” or “latent”) is a viral disease from the herpesviridae family caused by both Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). Infection with the herpes virus is categorized into one of several distinct disorders based on the site of infection. Oral herpes, the visible symptoms of which are colloquially called cold sores or fever blisters, is an infection of the face or mouth. Oral herpes is the most common form of infection. Genital herpes, known simply as herpes, is the second most common form of herpes. (more)

Japanse Encephalitis Vaccine

Japanese encephalitis vaccines became available in the 1950s. One of them was an inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine (the Nakayama and/or Beijing-1 strain), made by BIKEN and marketed by Sanofi Pasteur as JE-VAX, until production ceased in 2005. The other was an inactivated vaccine cultivated on primary hamster kidney cells (the Beijing-3 strain). The Beijing-3 strain was the main variant of the vaccine used in the People’s Republic of China from 1968 until 2005. (more)

Meningitis Vaccine, Pediatric

The Meningitis Vaccine Project is an effort to eliminate the meningitis epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa by developing a new meningococcal vaccine. The meningitis problem in that area is caused by a strain of meningitis called “meningitis A”, which is only present in the African meningitis belt. In June 2010 various sourced announced that they had developed MenAfriVac, which is an inexpensive, safe, and highly effective vaccine which is likely to stop the epidemic as quickly as anyone had ever hoped that it would. (more)

PIV3 (Parainfluenza Virus Type 3) / RSV Combination Vaccine

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that causes respiratory tract infections. It is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections and hospital visits during infancy and childhood. A prophylactic medication (not a vaccine) exists for preterm birth (under 35 weeks gestation) infants and infants with a congenital heart defect (CHD) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Treatment is limited to supportive care, including oxygen therapy. (more)

Plague Vaccine

A plague vaccine is used for an induction of active specific immunity in a susceptible organism to plague by means of administration an antigenic material (a vaccine) via a variety of routes to people at risk of contracting any clinical form of plague. This method is known as plague immunization. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of administration of some plague vaccines in preventing or ameliorating the effects of a variety of clinical forms of infection by Yersinia pestis. Plague immunization also encompasses incurring state of passive specific immunity to plague in a susceptible organism after administration of a plague serum or plague immunoglobulin in people with an immediate risk of developing the disease. (more)

RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) Vaccine

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that causes respiratory tract infections. It is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections and hospital visits during infancy and childhood. A prophylactic medication (not a vaccine) exists for preterm birth (under 35 weeks gestation) infants and infants with a congenital heart defect (CHD) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Treatment is limited to supportive care, including oxygen therapy. (more)

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine, Adults - Pediatric - Geriatric

The influenza vaccination, also known as a flu shot, is an annual vaccination using a vaccine specific for a given year to protect against the highly variable influenza virus. Each seasonal influenza vaccine contains three influenza viruses: one influenza type A subtype H3N2 virus strain, one influenza type A subtype H1N1 (seasonal) virus strain, and one influenza type B virus strain. A quadrivalent flu vaccine administered by nasal mist was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 2012. (more)

Smallpox Vaccine

The smallpox vaccine was the first successful vaccine to be developed. The process of vaccination was first publicised by Edward Jenner in 1796, who acted upon his observation that milkmaids who caught the cowpox virus did not catch smallpox. Before widespread vaccination, mortality rates in individuals with smallpox were high—up to 35% in some cases. (more)

Smoking Cessation Vaccine

Smoking cessation (colloquially quitting smoking) is the process of discontinuing the practice of inhaling a smoked substance. This article focuses exclusively on cessation of tobacco smoking; however, the methods described may apply to cessation of smoking other substances that can be difficult to stop using due to the development of strong physical substance dependence or psychological dependence (addiction). (more)

West Nile Virus Vaccine

West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. This flavivirus is found in temperate and tropical regions of the world. It was first identified in the West Nile subregion in the East African nation of Uganda in 1937. Prior to the mid 1990s, WNV disease occurred only sporadically and was considered a minor risk for humans, until an outbreak in Algeria in 1994, with cases of WNV-caused encephalitis, and the first large outbreak in Romania in 1996, with a high number of cases with neuroinvasive disease. WNV has now spread globally, with the first case in the Western Hemisphere being identified in New York City in 1999; over the next 5 years, the virus spread across the continental United States, north into Canada, and southward into the Caribbean Islands and Latin America. WNV also spread to Europe, beyond the Mediterranean Basin [a new strain of the virus was recently (2012) identified in Italy]. WNV is now considered to be an endemic pathogen in Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe and in the United States, which in 2012 has experienced one of its worst epidemics. (more)

Our Network

Andrew Kimball
Vice President, Business Development
214.563.3386 | andrew.kimball@platinum-research.net
www.platinum-research.net

Platinum Logo

Platinum Research Network (PRN) is a collaboration of established, independently-owned research sites designed to streamline the communication process with Sponsors and CROs, leading to faster start-up timelines, expedited enrollment, outstanding retention and the highest quality data. PRN sites are geographically, demographically and therapeutically diverse and consist of 6 companies with 16 individual site locations in 8 states including an international hub located in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Our Network

 
 
 
 

Platinum Logo

Platinum Research Network (PRN) is a collaboration of established, independently-owned research sites designed to streamline the communication process with Sponsors and CROs, leading to faster start-up timelines, expedited enrollment, outstanding retention and the highest quality data. PRN sites are geographically, demographically and therapeutically diverse and consist of 6 companies with 16 individual site locations in 8 states including an international hub located in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Andrew Kimball
Vice President, Business Development
214.563.3386 | andrew.kimball@platinum-research.net
www.platinum-research.net

Find a currently enrolling study near you! Contact Now!